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Overview
Comment:Fix a doc typo. Minor improvements to documentation linkage.
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SHA1: c468769dbca5199f57f432c6e517b330b591e986
User & Date: drh 2016-09-30 13:21:09
Context
2016-09-30
15:24
Add the --checkin option to the "fossil diff" command. check-in: e7c2454d user: drh tags: trunk
13:21
Fix a doc typo. Minor improvements to documentation linkage. check-in: c468769d user: drh tags: trunk
2016-09-29
11:59
Distinguish between a deleted file and a binary file in the side-by-side diff generator. Fix for a bug introduced by check-in [233e9328ee639b]. check-in: 1438be02 user: drh tags: trunk
Changes
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Changes to www/concepts.wiki.

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There are many such systems in use today.  Fossil strives to
distinguish itself from the others by being extremely simple
to setup and operate.

This document is intended as a quick introduction to the concepts
behind Fossil.






<h2>2.0 Composition Of A Project</h2>
<img src="concept1.gif" align="right" hspace="10">

A software project normally consists of a "source tree".
A source tree is a hierarchy of files that are used to generate
the end product.  The source tree changes over time as the
software grows and expands and as features are added and bugs







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There are many such systems in use today.  Fossil strives to
distinguish itself from the others by being extremely simple
to setup and operate.

This document is intended as a quick introduction to the concepts
behind Fossil.

See also:

  *  [./whyusefossil.wiki#definitions|Definitions]
  *  [./quickstart.wiki|Quick start guide]

<h2>2.0 Composition Of A Project</h2>
<img src="concept1.gif" align="right" hspace="10">

A software project normally consists of a "source tree".
A source tree is a hierarchy of files that are used to generate
the end product.  The source tree changes over time as the
software grows and expands and as features are added and bugs

Changes to www/server.wiki.

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Both of these commands start a Fossil server, usually on TCP port 8080, though
a higher numbered port might also be used if 8080 is already occupied.  You can
access these using URLs of the form <b>http://localhost:8080/</b>, or if 
<i>REPOSITORY</i> is a directory, URLs of the form
<b>http://localhost:8080/</b><i>repo</i><b>/</b> where <i>repo</i> is the base
name of the repository file without the ".fossil" suffix.
The difference between "ui" and "server" is that "ui" will
also start a web browser and points it
to the URL mentioned above, and the "ui" command binds to
the loopback IP address (127.0.0.1) only so that the "ui" command cannot be
used to serve content to a different machine.
</p>
<p>
If one of the commands above is run from within an open checkout,
then the <i>REPOSITORY</i> argument can be omitted and the checkout is used as







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Both of these commands start a Fossil server, usually on TCP port 8080, though
a higher numbered port might also be used if 8080 is already occupied.  You can
access these using URLs of the form <b>http://localhost:8080/</b>, or if 
<i>REPOSITORY</i> is a directory, URLs of the form
<b>http://localhost:8080/</b><i>repo</i><b>/</b> where <i>repo</i> is the base
name of the repository file without the ".fossil" suffix.
The difference between "ui" and "server" is that "ui" will
also start a web browser and point it
to the URL mentioned above, and the "ui" command binds to
the loopback IP address (127.0.0.1) only so that the "ui" command cannot be
used to serve content to a different machine.
</p>
<p>
If one of the commands above is run from within an open checkout,
then the <i>REPOSITORY</i> argument can be omitted and the checkout is used as

Changes to www/whyusefossil.wiki.

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     <ol type='i'>
     <li>Everyone always has the latest code
     <li>Failed disk-drives cause no loss of work
     <li>Avoid wasting time doing manual file copying
     <li>Avoid human errors during manual backups
     </ol>
  </ol>

<li><p><b>Definitions</b></p>
  <ul>
  <li><p><b>Project</b> &rarr;
       a collection of computer files that serve some common
      purpose.  Often the project is a software application and the
      individual files are source code together with makefiles, scripts, and
      "README.txt" files.  Other examples of projects include books or
................................................................................
         directory hierarchy - a single folder possibly with layers
         of subfolders.  Fossil is not a good choice for managing a
         project that has files scattered hither and yon all over
         the disk.  In other words, Fossil only works for projects
         where the files are laid out such that they can be archived
         into a ZIP file or tarball.
     </ul>
  <li><p><b>Repository</b>
      (also called "repo") &rarr; a single file that contains
      all historical versions of all files in a project.  A repo is similar
      to a ZIP archive in that it is a single file that stores compressed
      versions of many other files.  Files can be extracted from the
      repo and new files can be added to the repo, just as with a ZIP
      archive.  But a repo has other capabilities above and beyond
      what a ZIP archive can do.
      <ul>







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     <ol type='i'>
     <li>Everyone always has the latest code
     <li>Failed disk-drives cause no loss of work
     <li>Avoid wasting time doing manual file copying
     <li>Avoid human errors during manual backups
     </ol>
  </ol>
<a name='definitions'></a>
<li><p><b>Definitions</b></p>
  <ul>
  <li><p><b>Project</b> &rarr;
       a collection of computer files that serve some common
      purpose.  Often the project is a software application and the
      individual files are source code together with makefiles, scripts, and
      "README.txt" files.  Other examples of projects include books or
................................................................................
         directory hierarchy - a single folder possibly with layers
         of subfolders.  Fossil is not a good choice for managing a
         project that has files scattered hither and yon all over
         the disk.  In other words, Fossil only works for projects
         where the files are laid out such that they can be archived
         into a ZIP file or tarball.
     </ul>
  <li><p><b>Repository</b> &rarr;
      (also called "repo") a single file that contains
      all historical versions of all files in a project.  A repo is similar
      to a ZIP archive in that it is a single file that stores compressed
      versions of many other files.  Files can be extracted from the
      repo and new files can be added to the repo, just as with a ZIP
      archive.  But a repo has other capabilities above and beyond
      what a ZIP archive can do.
      <ul>