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Comment:Unnecessary type='text/javascript on <script> tag.
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Files: files | file ages | folders
SHA1: 5cdaeb0d822d3aebcd82124ccb17dfab4a187842
User & Date: jan.nijtmans 2016-06-28 09:10:23
Context
2016-07-05
14:23
Fix a timeline bug, showing an unintended arrow when closing a fork. check-in: f16e1a0e user: jan.nijtmans tags: trunk
14:17
Partially revert [f73411025e8ebec7]. This fixes a problem that when closing a fork by just doing "fossil merge" and additonal arrow going up is displayed. Probably not the right fix. Remark: reverting more than necessary. Already fixed on trunk. Closed-Leaf check-in: a78e5118 user: jan.nijtmans tags: close-fork-arrow
2016-07-04
20:13
Merge in trunk and resolve conflict. check-in: 003b6581 user: andybradford tags: stash-fixes
2016-06-28
09:10
Unnecessary type='text/javascript on <script> tag. check-in: 5cdaeb0d user: jan.nijtmans tags: trunk
2016-06-26
17:05
micro-optimizing invalid_utf8 function, should be as fast as possible now check-in: 7c08a685 user: jan.nijtmans tags: trunk
Changes
Hide Diffs Unified Diffs Ignore Whitespace Patch

Changes to src/makeheaders.html.

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files change, the entire program must be recompiled.
It also happens that those important .h files tend to be the ones that
change most frequently.
This means that the entire program must be recompiled frequently,
leading to a lengthy modify-compile-test cycle and a corresponding
decrease in programmer productivity.
<p><li>
The C programming language requires that declarations depending upon 
each other must occur in a particular order.
In a program with complex, interwoven data structures, the correct
declaration order can become very difficult to determine manually, 
especially when the declarations involved are spread out over several
files.
</ol>
</p>

<a name="H0004"></a>
<h3>1.2 The Makeheaders Solution</h3>

<p>
The makeheaders program is designed to ameliorate the problems associated
with the traditional C programming model by automatically generating
the interface information in the .h files from 
interface information contained in other .h files and
from implementation information in the .c files.
When the makeheaders program is run, it scans the source
files for a project,
then generates a series of new .h files, one for each .c file.
The generated .h files contain exactly those declarations required by the
corresponding .c files, no more and no less.
................................................................................
a problem.
Simply rerun makeheaders to resynchronize everything.
<p><li>
The generated .h file contains the minimal set of declarations needed
by the .c file.
This means that when something changes, a minimal amount of recompilation
is required to produce an updated executable.
Experience has shown that this gives a dramatic improvement 
in programmer productivity by facilitating a rapid modify-compile-test
cycle during development.
<p><li>
The makeheaders program automatically sorts declarations into the
correct order, completely eliminating the wearisome and error-prone
task of sorting declarations by hand.
</ol>
................................................................................
but manually entered .h files
that contain structure declarations and so forth will be scanned and
the declarations will be copied into the generated .h files as
appropriate.
But if makeheaders sees that the .h file that it has generated is no
different from the .h file it generated last time, it doesn't update
the file.
This prevents the corresponding .c files from having to 
be needlessly recompiled.
</p>

<p>
There are several options to the makeheaders program that can
be used to alter its behavior.
The default behavior is to write a single .h file for each .c file and
................................................................................
In this example, makeheaders will scan the three files named
``alpha.c'',
``beta.c'' and
``gamma.c''
but because of the colon on the end of third filename
it will only generate headers for the first two files.
Unfortunately,
it is not possible to get makeheaders to process any file whose 
name contains a colon.
</p>

<p>
In a large project, the length of the command line for makeheaders
can become very long.
If the operating system doesn't support long command lines
................................................................................
Such prototypes are normally omitted.
</p>

<p>
Finally, makeheaders also includes a ``-doc'' option.
This command line option prevents makeheaders from generating any
headers at all.
Instead, makeheaders will write to standard output 
information about every definition and declaration that it encounters
in its scan of source files.
The information output includes the type of the definition or
declaration and any comment that preceeds the definition or
declaration.
The output is in a format that can be easily parsed, and is
intended to be read by another program that will generate
................................................................................
<a name="H0007"></a>
<h3>3.1 The Basic Setup</h3>

<p>
The simpliest way to use makeheaders is to put all definitions in
one or more .c files and all structure and type declarations in
separate .h files.
The only restriction is that you should take care to chose basenames 
for your .h files that are different from the basenames for you
.c files.
Recall that if your .c file is named (for example) ``alpha.c''
makeheaders will attempt to generate a corresponding header file
named ``alpha.h''.
For that reason, you don't want to use that name for
any of the .h files you write since that will prevent makeheaders
................................................................................

<pre>
   makeheaders *.[ch]
</pre>

The makeheaders program will scan all of the .c files and all of the
manually written .h files and then automatically generate .h files
corresponding to all .c files.  
</p>

<p>
Note that
the wildcard expression used in the above example, 
``<code>*.[ch]</code>'',
will expand to include all .h files in the current directory, both
those entered manually be the programmer and others generated automatically
by a prior run of makeheaders.
But that is not a problem.
The makeheaders program will recognize and ignore any files it 
has previously generated that show up on its input list.
</p>

<a name="H0008"></a>
<h3>3.2 What Declarations Get Copied</h3>

<p>
................................................................................
declaration of that variable is placed in the header of every
.c file that uses the variable.
</p>

<p><li>
When a structure, union or enumeration declaration or a
function prototype or a C++ class declaration appears in a
manually produced .h file, that declaration is copied into the 
automatically generated
.h files of all .c files that use the structure, union, enumeration,
function or class.
But declarations that appear in a
.c file are considered private to that .c file and are not copied into
any automatically generated files.
</p>
................................................................................
<p>
You can instruct makeheaders to treat any part of a .c file as if
it were a .h file by enclosing that part of the .c file within:
<pre>
   #if INTERFACE
   #endif
</pre>
Thus any structure definitions that appear after the 
``#if INTERFACE'' but before the corresponding 
``#endif'' are eligable to be copied into the 
automatically generated
.h files of other .c files.
</p>

<p>
If you use the ``#if INTERFACE'' mechanism in a .c file,
then the generated header for that .c file will contain a line
................................................................................
<pre>
   #if EXPORT_INTERFACE
   #endif
</pre>
will become part of the exported interface.
The ``#if EXPORT_INTERFACE'' mechanism can be used in either
.c or .h files.
(The ``#if INTERFACE'' can also be used in both .h and .c files, 
but since it's use in a .h file would be redundant, we haven't mentioned
it before.)
</p>

<a name="H0011"></a>
<h3>3.5 Local declarations processed by makeheaders</h3>

................................................................................

<p>
Sometimes it is convenient to have makeheaders sort a sequence
of private declarations into the correct order for us automatically.
Or, we could have static functions and procedures for which we would like
makeheaders to generate prototypes, but the arguments to these
functions and procedures uses private declarations.
In both of these cases, we want makeheaders to be aware of the 
private declarations and copy them into the local header file,
but we don't want makeheaders to propagate the
declarations outside of the file in which they are declared.
</p>

<p>
When this situation arises, enclose the private declarations
................................................................................
file ``alpha.cpp'' will induce makeheaders to
generate a header file named ``alpha.hpp''.
</p>

<p>
Makeheaders augments class definitions by inserting prototypes to
methods were appropriate.  If a method definition begins with one
of the special keywords <b>PUBLIC</b>, <b>PROTECTED</b>, or 
<b>PRIVATE</b> (in upper-case to distinguish them from the regular
C++ keywords with the same meaning) then a prototype for that
method will be inserted into the class definition.  If none of
these keywords appear, then the prototype is not inserted.  For
example, in the following code, the constructor is not explicitly
declared in the class definition but makeheaders will add it there
because of the PUBLIC keyword that appears before the constructor
................................................................................
Perhaps these issued will be addressed in future revisions.
</p>

<a name="H0013"></a>
<h3>3.7 Conditional Compilation</h3>

<p>
The makeheaders program understands and tracks the conditional 
compilation constructs in the source code files it scans.
Hence, if the following code appears in a source file
<pre>
  #ifdef UNIX
  #  define WORKS_WELL  1
  #else
  #  define WORKS_WELL  0
................................................................................
as well as Cygwin32 and MSVC 5.0 for Win32.
</p>

<a name="H0017"></a>
<h2>6.0 Summary And Conclusion</h2>

<p>
The makeheaders program will automatically generate a minimal header file 
for each of a set of C source and header files, and will
generate a composite header file for the entire source file suite,
for either internal or external use.
It can also be used as the parser in an automated program
documentation system.
</p>








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files change, the entire program must be recompiled.
It also happens that those important .h files tend to be the ones that
change most frequently.
This means that the entire program must be recompiled frequently,
leading to a lengthy modify-compile-test cycle and a corresponding
decrease in programmer productivity.
<p><li>
The C programming language requires that declarations depending upon
each other must occur in a particular order.
In a program with complex, interwoven data structures, the correct
declaration order can become very difficult to determine manually,
especially when the declarations involved are spread out over several
files.
</ol>
</p>

<a name="H0004"></a>
<h3>1.2 The Makeheaders Solution</h3>

<p>
The makeheaders program is designed to ameliorate the problems associated
with the traditional C programming model by automatically generating
the interface information in the .h files from
interface information contained in other .h files and
from implementation information in the .c files.
When the makeheaders program is run, it scans the source
files for a project,
then generates a series of new .h files, one for each .c file.
The generated .h files contain exactly those declarations required by the
corresponding .c files, no more and no less.
................................................................................
a problem.
Simply rerun makeheaders to resynchronize everything.
<p><li>
The generated .h file contains the minimal set of declarations needed
by the .c file.
This means that when something changes, a minimal amount of recompilation
is required to produce an updated executable.
Experience has shown that this gives a dramatic improvement
in programmer productivity by facilitating a rapid modify-compile-test
cycle during development.
<p><li>
The makeheaders program automatically sorts declarations into the
correct order, completely eliminating the wearisome and error-prone
task of sorting declarations by hand.
</ol>
................................................................................
but manually entered .h files
that contain structure declarations and so forth will be scanned and
the declarations will be copied into the generated .h files as
appropriate.
But if makeheaders sees that the .h file that it has generated is no
different from the .h file it generated last time, it doesn't update
the file.
This prevents the corresponding .c files from having to
be needlessly recompiled.
</p>

<p>
There are several options to the makeheaders program that can
be used to alter its behavior.
The default behavior is to write a single .h file for each .c file and
................................................................................
In this example, makeheaders will scan the three files named
``alpha.c'',
``beta.c'' and
``gamma.c''
but because of the colon on the end of third filename
it will only generate headers for the first two files.
Unfortunately,
it is not possible to get makeheaders to process any file whose
name contains a colon.
</p>

<p>
In a large project, the length of the command line for makeheaders
can become very long.
If the operating system doesn't support long command lines
................................................................................
Such prototypes are normally omitted.
</p>

<p>
Finally, makeheaders also includes a ``-doc'' option.
This command line option prevents makeheaders from generating any
headers at all.
Instead, makeheaders will write to standard output
information about every definition and declaration that it encounters
in its scan of source files.
The information output includes the type of the definition or
declaration and any comment that preceeds the definition or
declaration.
The output is in a format that can be easily parsed, and is
intended to be read by another program that will generate
................................................................................
<a name="H0007"></a>
<h3>3.1 The Basic Setup</h3>

<p>
The simpliest way to use makeheaders is to put all definitions in
one or more .c files and all structure and type declarations in
separate .h files.
The only restriction is that you should take care to chose basenames
for your .h files that are different from the basenames for you
.c files.
Recall that if your .c file is named (for example) ``alpha.c''
makeheaders will attempt to generate a corresponding header file
named ``alpha.h''.
For that reason, you don't want to use that name for
any of the .h files you write since that will prevent makeheaders
................................................................................

<pre>
   makeheaders *.[ch]
</pre>

The makeheaders program will scan all of the .c files and all of the
manually written .h files and then automatically generate .h files
corresponding to all .c files.
</p>

<p>
Note that
the wildcard expression used in the above example,
``<code>*.[ch]</code>'',
will expand to include all .h files in the current directory, both
those entered manually be the programmer and others generated automatically
by a prior run of makeheaders.
But that is not a problem.
The makeheaders program will recognize and ignore any files it
has previously generated that show up on its input list.
</p>

<a name="H0008"></a>
<h3>3.2 What Declarations Get Copied</h3>

<p>
................................................................................
declaration of that variable is placed in the header of every
.c file that uses the variable.
</p>

<p><li>
When a structure, union or enumeration declaration or a
function prototype or a C++ class declaration appears in a
manually produced .h file, that declaration is copied into the
automatically generated
.h files of all .c files that use the structure, union, enumeration,
function or class.
But declarations that appear in a
.c file are considered private to that .c file and are not copied into
any automatically generated files.
</p>
................................................................................
<p>
You can instruct makeheaders to treat any part of a .c file as if
it were a .h file by enclosing that part of the .c file within:
<pre>
   #if INTERFACE
   #endif
</pre>
Thus any structure definitions that appear after the
``#if INTERFACE'' but before the corresponding
``#endif'' are eligable to be copied into the
automatically generated
.h files of other .c files.
</p>

<p>
If you use the ``#if INTERFACE'' mechanism in a .c file,
then the generated header for that .c file will contain a line
................................................................................
<pre>
   #if EXPORT_INTERFACE
   #endif
</pre>
will become part of the exported interface.
The ``#if EXPORT_INTERFACE'' mechanism can be used in either
.c or .h files.
(The ``#if INTERFACE'' can also be used in both .h and .c files,
but since it's use in a .h file would be redundant, we haven't mentioned
it before.)
</p>

<a name="H0011"></a>
<h3>3.5 Local declarations processed by makeheaders</h3>

................................................................................

<p>
Sometimes it is convenient to have makeheaders sort a sequence
of private declarations into the correct order for us automatically.
Or, we could have static functions and procedures for which we would like
makeheaders to generate prototypes, but the arguments to these
functions and procedures uses private declarations.
In both of these cases, we want makeheaders to be aware of the
private declarations and copy them into the local header file,
but we don't want makeheaders to propagate the
declarations outside of the file in which they are declared.
</p>

<p>
When this situation arises, enclose the private declarations
................................................................................
file ``alpha.cpp'' will induce makeheaders to
generate a header file named ``alpha.hpp''.
</p>

<p>
Makeheaders augments class definitions by inserting prototypes to
methods were appropriate.  If a method definition begins with one
of the special keywords <b>PUBLIC</b>, <b>PROTECTED</b>, or
<b>PRIVATE</b> (in upper-case to distinguish them from the regular
C++ keywords with the same meaning) then a prototype for that
method will be inserted into the class definition.  If none of
these keywords appear, then the prototype is not inserted.  For
example, in the following code, the constructor is not explicitly
declared in the class definition but makeheaders will add it there
because of the PUBLIC keyword that appears before the constructor
................................................................................
Perhaps these issued will be addressed in future revisions.
</p>

<a name="H0013"></a>
<h3>3.7 Conditional Compilation</h3>

<p>
The makeheaders program understands and tracks the conditional
compilation constructs in the source code files it scans.
Hence, if the following code appears in a source file
<pre>
  #ifdef UNIX
  #  define WORKS_WELL  1
  #else
  #  define WORKS_WELL  0
................................................................................
as well as Cygwin32 and MSVC 5.0 for Win32.
</p>

<a name="H0017"></a>
<h2>6.0 Summary And Conclusion</h2>

<p>
The makeheaders program will automatically generate a minimal header file
for each of a set of C source and header files, and will
generate a composite header file for the entire source file suite,
for either internal or external use.
It can also be used as the parser in an automated program
documentation system.
</p>

Changes to src/setup.c.

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  @ <form action="%s(g.zPath)" method="post"><div>
  login_insert_csrf_secret();
  if( login_is_special(zLogin) ){
    @ <input type="hidden" name="login" value="%s(zLogin)">
    @ <input type="hidden" name="info" value="">
    @ <input type="hidden" name="pw" value="*">
  }
  @ <script type='text/javascript'>
  @ function updateCapabilityString(){
  @   /*
  @   ** This function updates the "#usetupEditCapability" span content
  @   ** with the capabilities selected by the interactive user, based
  @   ** upon the state of the capability checkboxes.
  @   */
  @   try {
................................................................................
    @   <td>&nbsp;</td>
    @   <td><input type="submit" name="submit" value="Apply Changes" /></td>
    @ </tr>
  }
  @ </table>
  @ </div></form>
  @ </div>
  @ <script type='text/javascript'>updateCapabilityString();</script>
  @ <h2>Privileges And Capabilities:</h2>
  @ <ul>
  if( higherUser ){
    @ <li><p class="missingPriv">
    @ User %h(zLogin) has Setup privileges and you only have Admin privileges
    @ so you are not permitted to make changes to %h(zLogin).
    @ </p></li>







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  @ <form action="%s(g.zPath)" method="post"><div>
  login_insert_csrf_secret();
  if( login_is_special(zLogin) ){
    @ <input type="hidden" name="login" value="%s(zLogin)">
    @ <input type="hidden" name="info" value="">
    @ <input type="hidden" name="pw" value="*">
  }
  @ <script>
  @ function updateCapabilityString(){
  @   /*
  @   ** This function updates the "#usetupEditCapability" span content
  @   ** with the capabilities selected by the interactive user, based
  @   ** upon the state of the capability checkboxes.
  @   */
  @   try {
................................................................................
    @   <td>&nbsp;</td>
    @   <td><input type="submit" name="submit" value="Apply Changes" /></td>
    @ </tr>
  }
  @ </table>
  @ </div></form>
  @ </div>
  @ <script>updateCapabilityString();</script>
  @ <h2>Privileges And Capabilities:</h2>
  @ <ul>
  if( higherUser ){
    @ <li><p class="missingPriv">
    @ User %h(zLogin) has Setup privileges and you only have Admin privileges
    @ so you are not permitted to make changes to %h(zLogin).
    @ </p></li>

Changes to www/copyright-release.html.

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</ol>

<p>By filling in the following information and signing your name,
you agree to be bound by all of the terms
set forth in this agreement.  Please print clearly.</p>

<p><table width="80%" border="1" cellpadding="0" cellspacing="0" align="center">
<tr><td width="20%" valign="top">Your name &amp email:</td><td width="80%">

    <!-- Replace this line with your name and email --> &nbsp;<p>&nbsp;

</td></tr>
<tr><td valign="top">Company name:<br>(if applicable)</td><td>

    <!-- Replace this line with your company name --> &nbsp;<p>&nbsp;







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</ol>

<p>By filling in the following information and signing your name,
you agree to be bound by all of the terms
set forth in this agreement.  Please print clearly.</p>

<p><table width="80%" border="1" cellpadding="0" cellspacing="0" align="center">
<tr><td width="20%" valign="top">Your name &amp; email:</td><td width="80%">

    <!-- Replace this line with your name and email --> &nbsp;<p>&nbsp;

</td></tr>
<tr><td valign="top">Company name:<br>(if applicable)</td><td>

    <!-- Replace this line with your company name --> &nbsp;<p>&nbsp;